LANGSA 2022 Graduate Conference: Into The New World
UPDATE:
Call for papers extended to March 4th.

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a global crisis and led to lockdowns in many countries in 2020.

The immediate and long-term consequences have impacted different aspects of our life such as our work

place, teaching,ecological developments, technology, ways of communication, the arts and numerous other

areas. This complex situationrequires a multidisciplinary approach in order to grapple with the changes

and find new ways to go forward into the new world. To address this new landscape,

this conference proposes to explore possible answers to different questions.:

First, which fields were affected by the pandemic and how?

Second, how can the humanities contribute to this discourse?

Third, how has the pandemic shaped our understanding of the world as it is?

Finally, what was indeed necessary in the previous state of affairs

and what has revealed itself to merely be a construct?

The investigation must include input from a broad range of human sciences, including anthropology,

geography, sociology, political science, philosophy and literature. 

The 2022  LANGSA Annual Conference will take place on

March 25th and welcomes papers and

panels on the topics below. Abstracts must be submitted in English. They must be between

200-300 words, include speaker’s institutional affiliation, and a short bio. Presentations will be

no longer than 15 minutes and panels no longer than 60. We also invite graduate students to

present fictional work, such as short stories, poems and songs.

All presenters will have the opportunity to publish their paper in The Quiet Corner

Interdisciplinary Journal, the open-access digital publication of the Department of Literatures,

Cultures and Languages at the University of Connecticut[1]. We have partnered with

The Quiet Corner Interdisciplinary Journal and aim to produce a volume featuring articles by

this year’s presenters. The deadline for submission of the article will be 3 weeks after the

graduate conference is a great opportunity especially for graduate students who

haven’t published anything yet.

We invite graduate students from a wide range of disciplines including:

- Literary studies
- Cultural studies
- Communications
- Creative writing
- Animal Studies
- Disability Studies
- Medical Humanities
- The Anthropocene
- Environmental Humanities
- Postcolonial Studies
- Atmospheric Studies
- Film Theory
- Posthumanism
- Biopolitics
- Gender Studies
- Racism and Xenophobia
- Cultural Studies
- Linguistic Studies
- Urban Studies
- Decolonial Studies
- Migration and Borders
- Visual and Media Studies
- Digital Humanities

 

All submissions must be emailed to langsa@uconn.edu before February 11th. 

 
 

 

When Nature Fights Back:

Challanges to the Anthropocene

and Environmental Narratives

 

 

Date: April 17, 2020

Venue: Gentry 144, University of Connecticut




Recent attention has been dedicated to the study of environmental narratives that relate to current threats to the survival of the planet: global warming, environmental catastrophes, the extinction of species, massive migration crises, etc. A multidisciplinary approach to the discourses that have shaped our understanding of the human sciences is necessary in order to challenge the anthropocentric logic that has framed discussions on the topic. The binaries of nature and culture, human and non-human, subject and object, need to be reexamined not as the polar opposites in which they have been traditionally articulated, but as part of a larger complexity. To this end, the investigation into the multiple and fragmented concept of the human and its environment must, perforce, include input from a broad range of human sciences, including anthropology, geography, sociology, political science, philosophy and literature. These discussions would benefit from from the incorporation of recent theorizations that contest the centrality of the concept of Man and its historical implications in fields such as gender studies, animal studies, decolonial theory, and critical race theory, to name a few. Such approaches drive towards an answer to the question of how “Man” and Nature are culturally and socially constructed, and they allow for a critical elaboration of new epistemologies.
The X Annual Langsa Conference will take place on April 17th and welcomes papers and panels on the topics below. Abstracts must be submitted in English and must be between 200-300 words, include speaker’s institutional affiliation and short bio. Presentations will be no longer than 15 minutes and panels no longer than 60.
All selected papers will be submitted to The Quiet Corner Interdisciplinary Journal, the open-access digital publication of the Department of Literatures, Cultures and Languages at the University of Connecticut[1]. We have partnered with The Quiet Corner Interdisciplinary Journal and aim to produce a volume featuring articles by this year’s presenters.
- Animal Studies
- Disablity Studies
- Medical Humanities
- The Anthropocene
- Environmental Humanities
- Postcolonial Studies
- Atmospheric Studies
- Film Theory
- Post-Humanism
- Biopolitics
- Gender Studies
- Racism and Xenophobia
- Cultural Studies
- Linguistic Studies
- Urban Studies
- Decolonial Studies
- Migration and Borders
- Visual and Media Studies
- Digital Humanities
 
 
All submissions must be emailed to langsa.uconn@gmail.com before February 29th. (Extended to March 8th)
 
[1] Abstracts will be due February 29th (Extended to March 8th). If accepted, finished papers will be submitted on the day of the conference. Submission does not guarantee publication. All papers go through a double-blind peer review before publication. Authors will have the opportunity to receive constructive feedback from peers or scholars in the field.

 

Call for Papers - Deadline extended to March 8th

 

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